High School 2 College

July 24, 2017

Before You Pack For College, Read This

Congratulations!  You’ve made it all the way through high school.  You applied to many colleges (or just your favorite), got into at least one, and are headed off to college very soon.

Here’s my best advice for you to get ready for the big move:

1.  GET A SHOT!  I can’t say it loudly enough.  Get a meningitis shot.  The old ones lasted 5 years.  They now have vaccines that last 10 years.  If you’re not sure if you’ve had one, call your doctor and ask.  Hardly anyone gets meningitis, but it’s often fatal if you do.  Why take a chance?  One girl did — read about it here.

 Please, please don’t put it off.  Make an appointment now because they sometimes run out of vaccine.

2.  Start saving Bed, Bath, and Beyond coupons.  They come in the mail.  Save them.  The store doesn’t mind your using expired coupons.  Bed, Bath, and Beyond has a good selection of college stuff starting early in August.  Marsha, a wise friend of mine, gave me the following advice and she was right:  Buy everything you think you might possibly need, but don’t open it until you get to college.  If you don’t need it in your particular dorm room, your parents can always take it back to the store and return it if they keep the receipt.

3.  Start making a backpack of all the stuff you’ll need the minute you arrive at college:

  • duct tape
  • masking tape
  • extension cords (at least one with surge protector)
  • hammer
  • screw driver (flat and phillips)
  • flash light
  • sharpie marker (there will be something you forgot to label or that your roommate has the exact same one of)
  • small notepad and pen

There’s lots more stuff you will need, but these are things you might need right away to put your room in order and will certainly get lost if you pack them with the other junk.

4.  Get a new laptop.  If yours is more than 4 or 5 years old, you might want a new one.  You probably won’t need a printer (they’re handy but take up precious desktop room and every school has convenient places to print out papers), but you will need a laptop to bring to class, to submit assignments, and to drag to the library or to a friend’s dorm room for a group project.

5.  Ask what cell phone carrier works best at your school.  I know from my son that if you don’t have Verizon at Cornell, you don’t have reception.  If you know someone at the school you’ll be going to, ask about who’s got the best reception.  If you don’t know anyone there, find a facebook group of last year’s freshmen and ask them.  While you’re at it, try to get your parents to pay for unlimited text messages.  You’ll need it!

6.  Expect to feel out of place for a little while.  I have to confess — I cried through most of my freshman year.  I didn’t want to live home again, I just wanted my life the way it was back in high school with all my comfortable friends, with clean clothes that appeared regularly in my room, with free food in the fridge.  I thought everyone else was having a blast, and I was the only one feeling sad, lonely, uncomfortable, sick of hearing my roommate’s music.  I saw everyone’s happy faces going to class and I felt even more alone.  Little did I know that many of them were smiling on the outside and feeling exactly the same as I did on the inside.  I think if I knew that – and if I knew then how certainly this feeling would pass by springtime – I wouldn’t have felt quite so confused.  So I’m telling you now:  It’s not only okay to feel disassociated your first few months at college, it’s normal.  Really.

7.  Don’t forget who you are.  This article states it best:  don’t forget your goals, your abilities, your family, your values, or yourself.  Eat right at least several times a week.  Call home now and then.  Warn your parents in advance if you are dying your hair purple or shaving it off so they won’t faint when you come home for Columbus weekend or Thanksgiving.  Don’t ride the wave of good times and parties if you haven’t started that paper that’s due next month.

The key to success in college is to embrace the adult in you.  Plan out your schoolwork so you’ll have time for work and time for relaxation.  And asking for academic advice doesn’t mean that you’re letting someone tell you what to do — it just means gathering others’ expertise before you make a decision.

I hope I haven’t made you too nervous.  I just want you to be as prepared as you can be.  Keep in touch with your old friends, your family — and me!

Wendy Segal577070_479496568742293_1695834639_n

http://www.wendysegaltutoring.com

 

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August 13, 2014

What If I Didn’t Do Well In High School? Can I Still Get Into College? Should I Even Go to College?

You worked hard in high school, devoted yourself to your studies, got really good grades, played on a team or two, and spent weekends reading to retired soldiers, and then you had to choose among the 10 colleges who wanted you to enroll, right?

Not everyone’s that lucky, smart, mature, motivated, talented, aware in their teens.  Not everyone has the grades to have a choice of colleges.

What do those kids do?

First you have to figure out why you didn’t do as well as you would have liked in high school.

Academic challenges.  If high school was too hard for you, chances are you shouldn’t be going directly to a standard four year college.  College learning isn’t easier than high school learning. Sure, you’ll be able to take classes that are closer to your interests, but most colleges require students to take specific classes in the first year or two, and then specific classes within a major.

Motivational challenges.  It’s hard to get motivated to turn in that project if you don’t see the point of it.  If you don’t have a vision of what you want to do with your life, it’s likely that you don’t feel like working hard in any class.  If your parents nag, if your friends are out partying, if you indulge in a little recreational substance from time to time, if school starts too early, it’s hard to work up the drive to do that next geometry worksheet or take chapter notes on that assigned novel.  I have bad news for you: it’s even harder to get motivated in college where they don’t take attendance, they don’t assign daily assignments, and they don’t call your parents if you’re falling behind.

Sometimes, kids just wake up too late.  If you didn’t put any effort into grades 8 through 11, you may find yourself in a common situation.  You can get really good grades now, but is it too late?

Here are some solutions:

Go to a very easy college, work hard, and then transfer.  If you’re perfectly capable of doing college-level work but just woke up to the value of good grades too late, you can explain it in your application essay. Lots of kids don’t realize the value of hard work in high school at 15 or 16 and don’t put in any effort until they’re nearly ready to graduate.  There are many colleges that accept those students. You probably won’t get a scholarship, and you might never have heard of the school, but there are legitimate schools where you can go and experience college and college life. Hey, you may even wind up liking that school and want to stay, but if you do well, you most certainly can transfer if you choose.

Go to a community college and take some remedial classes in areas where you faced academic challenges.  If high school was too hard for you, it might have been because you just never got the academic attention when you needed it in middle school.  Perhaps you never really got math.  Perhaps you never learned to write a cogent essay.  Perhaps you always found literature too challenging.  Community colleges usually offer classes where you can work on those weaknesses until your academic level is ready for college.  You don’t even have to live home.  Several community colleges have the option to live in dorms while you are enrolled.  For some students, an associates degree is sufficient for their career choice.  Others can transfer to a school that they are proud to attend when their skills have improved.

Join the military.  Like the ads say, they’ll train you in a career and pay for your college when you’re done. If your problem was motivational, you might just need a little time to mature.  The military will do that for you – quick!  You can help your country while you help yourself.

Choose a career that doesn’t require advanced education.  Despite what it seems, college just isn’t for everyone, and it doesn’t have to be.  Use your personality and go into sales or public relations.  Use your talent and become a musician or artist or photographer.  Use your ability to work with your hands and become a carpenter or plumber or auto mechanic.  Imagine how much farther ahead you’ll be – your peers will be first looking for a job in four years but you’ll be well into your career.

Remember too that there’s no rule that you much go to college immediately after high school. There are programs where you can go abroad for a year or so before you think about college. Google “gap year programs” and you’ll be surprised by all the opportunities.  Many students find that a year abroad gives them time to grow up and refine their goals, and gives them something to offer a college when they’re done.

There are so many options.  Don’t succumb to what you perceive as societal pressure.  Find the path that looks like it might work for you and get going.  Even if you change directions somewhere down the lane, at least you will have begun the journey.

Wendy Segal

http://www.wendysegaltutoring.com

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